jQuery deferred

The Deferred object has been in jQuery since version 1.5 but I haven’t had the chance to get to know it until recently – turns out that it’s rather handy to have in your toolset.

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QUnit

Another handy javascript lib for your toolbox, but this time, for a slightly different purpose than usual – unit testing

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Web sockets

Web socket is a technology developed to establish a bi-directional communication between client and server, over the web. It works on top of TCP and hopefully will render hacks like long polling obsolete. It’s supported by all modern browsers with 2 exceptions – opera mini and the default android browser (chart can be found here).

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sammy.js

Another nice javascript lib that’s handy to have in your utility belt. From the library website - sammy is “a small web framework with class”. I’m sure there’s much more to it than what I will describe here, but there’s one aspect I’d like to focus on: view switching.

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CoffeeScript

There’s been a lot of fuss about coffee script in the last few months. It’s a language that compiles into pure javascript. Some people like it, some don’t. So what’s it all about?

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knockout.js

Knockout is a MVVM framework for javascript. It has been around for a while, but I never spent too much time with it until recently, when pluralsight released a free training that included knockout. My impressions – this is definitely something I could utilize in quite a few places, but it carries a pretty big startup cost, so I’d think hard before using it in a project.

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CSS Preprocessors – Sass, Less, Stylus

CSS has been around for a while and will stay for a while longer and although I think it’s a good and working ‘language’ it has a few pitfalls – the biggest one being the lack of ability to reuse certain parts. Take colors for example, when you want to style a site you need to repeat the color declaration everywhere you want to set it, so when you change your mind, the only way to implement the changes is search and replace. Now that’s not that bad when you have a small site and one css file, but when the number of files grows, that problem grows along. So what can we do?

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WYSIWYG, WYSIWYM and all that jazz

So you have a requirement – supply the possibility to create and edit rich formatted text in a web application. Seems pretty straightforward – use a ready editor and you’re done.

Now, add some constraints to that, like – the editor needs to be dead simple because the target user does not care about all that semantic stuff (that’s your job), it needs to perform well and be as intuitive as it gets.

This is a pretty valid requirement and in todays web is pretty common, but as it turns out, there isn’t a lot of maneuvering space here.

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